Energy tradeoffs and economic feasibility of irrigation development in the Pacific Northwest
Read Online
Share

Energy tradeoffs and economic feasibility of irrigation development in the Pacific Northwest

  • 242 Want to read
  • ·
  • 41 Currently reading

Published by College of Agriculture Research Center, Washington State University in [Pullman, Wash.] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Irrigation -- Economic aspects -- Northwest, Pacific,
  • Irrigation efficiency -- Northwest, Pacific,
  • Electric power production -- Northwest, Pacific

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementNorman K. Whittlesey ... [et al.].
SeriesBulletin / College of Agriculture Research Center, Washington State University -- 0896, Bulletin (Washington State University. College of Agriculture. Research Center) -- 896.
ContributionsWhittlesey, Norman K., Washington State University. College of Agriculture. Research Center.
The Physical Object
Pagination30 p. :
Number of Pages30
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14551754M
OCLC/WorldCa19356998

Download Energy tradeoffs and economic feasibility of irrigation development in the Pacific Northwest

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

To address this gap, in the Irrigation Association commissioned a study to quantify the irrigation industry’s direct and indirect impact on the U.S. economy. Completed in April , the study’s preliminary estimates indicate that the irrigation industry contributes: More than $19 billion per year to gross domestic product. Economic and Conservation Tradeoffs of Regulatory vs. Incentive-based Water Policy in the Pacific Northwest June International Journal of Water Resources Development 16(2)Author: Glenn Schaible. Energy Tradeoffs and Economic Feasibility of Irrigation Development in the Pacific Northwest," College of Agriculture Research Center Bulletin , Estimates of the Elasticities of Supply of Selected Agricultural Commodities.". Economic, social and environmental change is inherent to development. Whilst development aims to bring about positive change it can lead to conflicts. In the past, the promotion of economic growth as the motor for increased well-being was the main development thrust with little sensitivity to adverse social or environmental impacts.

development in Deschutes Basin, along with technology needed to develop selected sites and economic feasibility of developing sites. Three likely scenarios for additional hydropower generation: add new generators at non-powered dams (NPDs) and diversion structures; add new generators in existing irrigation canals and conduits; and. In a solar-powered irrigation systems (SPIS), electricity is generated by solar photovoltaic (PV) panels and used to operate pumps for the abstraction, lifting and/or distribution of irrigation water. SPIS can be applied in a wide range of scales, from individual or community vegetable gardens to large irrigation . Whittlesey, N. K., J. R. Buteau, W. R. Butcher, and D. Walker, Energy Trade-offs and Economic Feasibility of Irrigation Development in the Pacific Northwest. Irrigation water use is the total irrigation amount applied to cereal crops per unit area (m 3 /ha), and area supported by unit of irrigation water use is the reciprocal of irrigation water use. Fertilization, agricultural film and agricultural pesticide per unit area are calculated as the ratio of the total amount to the crop planting area.

Irrigation Feasibility Study For The Pombo Property Gerry N. Kamilos, LLC PACIFIC ADVANCED CIVIL ENGINEERING, INC. Newhope Street, Suite Fountain Valley, CA Prepared for: Job # E Prepared by: Revised Ap Revised Janu Janu Irrigation modernization is a promising pathway to update critical rural infrastructure while delivering transformative change in water resilience and distributed hydropower production. This project supports research and development efforts toward unlocking greater economic, energy, and water security potential of irrigation modernization projects. Energy development is the field of activities focused on obtaining sources of energy from natural resources. These activities include production of conventional, alternative and renewable sources of energy, and for the recovery and reuse of energy that would otherwise be wasted. Energy conservation and efficiency measures reduce the demand for energy development, and can have benefits to. In this paper, onfarm water conservation and agricultural economic trade-offs between selected regulatory and conservation-incentive water-policy choices are evaluated for the Pacific Northwest. Five broad water-policy perspectives are analysed using a total of 37 alternative policy scenarios. Policy analyses use a primal/dual-based, multi-product, normalized restricted-equilibrium model of.